The Adventurers:

Maj. John Dougherty/Daugherty (1791-1860)

& his Grandfather: Capt. John Dougherty/Daugherty (1743-1828)

Son of Michael (Oge) Daugherty (1714-1789) & Mary Clark,

Son of Michael (Mor) Daugherty (ca 1690- ) & Catherine Rodgers (McRory)

 

Capt. JOHN DAUGHERTY, Sr. (Michael Daugherty II8, Michael Mor Daugherty I7, Liam O'Dougherty6, Liam O'Dougherty5, Sean O'Dochartaigh4, Conn O'Dochartaigh3, Aodh O'Dochartaigh2, Cornelius O'Dochartaigh1) was born 1743 in Forks of James River, Augusta (now Rockbridge) Co., VA. He married Isabelle Anna Patton BEF 1769 in Augusta Co., VA, daughter of John Patton and Sarah Rogers, sister of James Patton. She was born ABT 1755.

The first of the family to go to Kentucky, John moved in 1811 to Indiana. He died on 14 Feb 1828 at Orange Co., IN, and was buried in his field in Sect. 26, Twp. 2 N, Range 1 E, Dugger Ceme., Orange Co. (his wife by his side a few months later, and in due course, their son George and his wife Hannah), in Stamper Creek Primitive Baptist Church, Paoli, IN.

There is a memorial about 4 feet wide. On the west side is Captain John & Isabella's birth and death date and then their children are listed with their wives. All eleven of them. Capt. John's son, Robert b. 1790 and his wife Sarah, and their son Robert S. b. 1818 are also buried there. William b. 1779 and Elizabeth (Betsy Tanner) are buried in the old Dugger Cemetery in Dugger, IN. James Tanner b. 1812 and Amanda Jane (Snyder) are buried at Pleasant Hill Cemetery, MO.

On the East side on the left is engraved the Dougherty coat of arms....engraved under it is "Original Coat of arms worn by the Lords of Innisowen of Dougherty Castle on Lock Swilley, Donegal Co. Ire. Its meaning: translated ' For My Hereditary Right.' " On the right is an engraving of a castle and under, "Ingraved in stone above the fireplace in main room of the castle: These words: 'Accepted Christianity 652 AD' Our first known ancestor was: Sir Cahir O'Dogherty." It is unknown who placed the memorial or when (Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, pp. 131-132).

Capt. JOHN and Henry DAUGHERTY were farming on Reedy Creek of New River Valley (later Rockbridge Co.), from whence in Jun 1769 the Long Hunters left to explore the Kentucky Country in 1766 at Augusta Co., VA. He and Henry DAUGHERTY acquired land on Laurel Creek of North Holston circa 1770 at Fincastle Co., VA.

He began military service in 1774 at Fincastle Co., VA, was a Capt. in the Virginia militia, including a chore of delivering horses prior to the Battle of Point Pleasant on the Ohio River. He went into court to prove that part of his left ear had been bitten off in an affray. The grand jury, among its members Benjamin Logan who took a colony to Lincoln Co., KY, indicted Isaac Spratt for this act, but also presented John Dougherty for unlawfully quarreling. The Spratts were neighbors who had sold land to John's brother George Daugherty on 3 May 1774 at Fincastle Co., VA.

He was mentioned in a number of depositions between 1775 and 1795 at KY. He entered land on Goose Creek, near the future site of Louisville, for his brother Joseph in 1776 at Kentucky (now Jefferson) Co. He and John Wilson settled at Locust Thicket near Danville, KY, having raised a crop of corn there in 1775. In March they made a journey to the Falls of the Ohio "to see the country and make improvements and Entrys."

During Indian attacks of 1776, others left to live in a fort, but John Daugherty remained on the disputed land. His near neighbor Archibald McNeil was killed by Indians in 1777; in 1778 Dougherty was Capt. of a militia company in Jan 1776 at Lincoln (now Boyle) Co. He opened an account with Henderson's Transylvania Company on 20 Apr 1776 at KY. It is unlikely that he brought his family to Locust Thicket until now, but meanwhile he had been acquiring large tracts of land south of Danville.

He owned thousands of acres and had Dougherty Station 1.5 miles below Danville on a branch of Clark's Run then known as Dougherty's Creek but now as Balls Branch, near the Wilderness Trace. John built his house on a slight eminence about 200 yards from the confluence of Dougherty's Creek and Clark's Run and it was visible from the Trace. His brother Robert lived in the vicinity for several years in 1778 at Lincoln Co.

He and his brother Robert appear to have participated in Capt. Benjamin Logan's expedition against the Shawnees and the Chillicothe town on the Little Miami River for the following month. Capt John Dougherty did serve under Logan, second in command to Gen. George Rogers Clark in the July 1780 expedition across the Ohio in Apr 1779 at Kentucky Co. He appeared in the Virginia Commissioners' land court, and again in Nov, and again on Feb 15 and 16, 1780 on 27 Oct 1779 at Harrodsburg, KY.

He led as Capt. a company of 42 men, including his brothers Robert and George, on Clark's expedition following the Blue Licks disaster. The Indians never gave Kentucky any great trouble after this expedition, and the number of settlers increased rapidly between 24 Oct 1782 and 24 Nov 1782 at KY. Most of the land around Dougherty's Station was being farmed, and a grist mill was built nearby on Dougherty's Creek.

John and his brothers Joseph and James were the only three Daughertys on the 1783 Lincoln Co. tax list in 1783 at Lincoln (now Boyle) Co.), KY.

He continued purchasing land in the Hanging Fork of Dix River area, but evidently by winter he determined move to Jefferson Co. On 2 Mar 1785 he surveyed 1000 acres on Goose Creek, adjoining land he had marked and improved for his brother Joseph in 1776 between 1784 and 1785 at Lincoln Co., KY. He began selling his land in the Danville area at an average of more than a pound per acre in 1786 at Lincoln Co., KY. He acquired and surveyed 1600 acres on Mill Creek; he now had 4000 acres in the Jefferson Co. area on 17 Jan 1789 at Jefferson (now Trimble) Co., KY. He was referred to as "of Lincoln Co." and "of Jefferson Co." on various deeds between 1790 and 1793. He acquired and had surveyed 1500 acres on the middle fork of Pitman Creek adjoining James Dozier and John Boss. He sent his sons Michael, about 20 and George, about 17 with James McCullough and Burrell Jackson to make the survey on 19 Jun 1790 at Nelson (now Green) Co., KY.

He lived in 1793 at Jefferson Co., KY (and Isabelle and the younger children were living on Goose Creek near Louisville, and Michael moved up from Nelson Co. and acquired land on Dougherty's Creek of the Little Kentucky River in Henry (now Trimble) Co., where he remained until his death in 1830). He most of the family, including his brothers Henry, Joseph, and George and their families, were concentrated in Jefferson or Henry Cos in 1800 at Jefferson Co., KY.

He appointed his son George as agent to sell his Mill Creek land and possibly made his first trip into Indiana Terr., where settlement had begun the previous year in 1802 at Jefferson Co., KY. He was appointed Justice of the Peace.

Only Michael of his sons remained in KY when Capt. John and his other children moved to Indiana Terr., settling on 7 Mar 1811 at Harrison Co., IN. The family began entering land and most of his sons came to live there; two taught school in log cabins; some operated grist mills; they served in the militia and some had small civil posts, just as in VA and KY in 1812 at Stampers Creek Twp., Orange Co., IN. His son-in-law William Charles, Mary's husband, was killed by Indians in one of their last incursions in the area in 1813 at Orange Co., IN.

In 1774 in Fincastle Co., VA, John Daugherty was a Capt. in the Virginia militia, including a chore of delivering horses prior to the Battle of Point Pleasant on the Ohio River (DAR Patriot Index, by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution. DAR, Washington, DC, 1994, Part I, p. 765).

On 3 May 1774, Fincastle Co., VA, John Daugherty went into court to prove that part of his left ear had been bitten off in an affray. The grand jury, among its members Benjamin Logan who took a colony to Lincoln Co., KY, indicted Isaac Spratt for this act, but also presented John Dougherty for unlawfully quarreling. The Spratts were neighbors who had sold land to John's brother George Daugherty (Annals of Southwest Virginia, by Lewis Preston Summers, p. 624).

Shortly after 7 FEB 1775, JOHN appears to have left Virginia for the Kentucky country, the first of his family to settle there. He and John Wilson settled at Locust Thicket near Danville, KY, having raised a crop of corn there in 1775. In March they made a journey to the Falls of the Ohio "to see the country and make improvements and Entrys." During Indian attacks of 1776, others left to live in a fort, but John Daugherty remained on the disputed land. His near neighbor Archibald McNeil was killed by Indians in 1777; in 1778 Dougherty was Capt. of a militia company (Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, Vol. 53, 1955, p. 128).

It is unlikely that he brought his family to Locust Thicket until now, but meanwhile he had been acquiring large tracts of land south of Danville. He owned thousands of acres and had Dougherty Station 1.5 miles below Danville on a branch of Clark's Run then known as Dougherty's Creek but now as Balls Branch, near the Wilderness Trace. John built his house on a slight eminence about 200 yards from the confluence of Dougherty's Creek and Clark's Run and it was visible from the Trace. His brother ROBERT lived in the vicinity for several years.

John's brother HENRY followed him to Kentucky permanently within three years, returning to Virginia only to settle the estate of their father, MICHAEL (II) who died in 1789 (Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, p. 128).

On 20 Apr 1776 in Kentucky, JOHN opened an account with Henderson's Transylvania Company. In 1776 he entered land on Goose Creek, near the future site of Louisville, for his brother JOSEPH.

On 27 Oct 1779, Harrodsburg, KY, he appeared in the Virginia Commissioners' land court, and again in Nov, and again on Feb 15 and 16, 1780.

Between 24 Oct and 24 Nov 1782, in Kentucky he led as Capt. a company of 42 men, including his brothers ROBERT and GEORGE, on Clark's expedition following the Blue Licks disaster. The Indians never gave Kentucky any great trouble after this expedition, and the number of settlers increased rapidly.

In 1783, most of the land around Dougherty's Station was being farmed, and a grist mill was built nearby on Dougherty's Creek. John and his brothers JOSEPH and JAMES were the only three Daughertys on the 1783 Lincoln Co. tax list. Between 1784-1785 he continued purchasing land in the Hanging Fork of Dix River area, but evidently by winter he determined move to Jefferson Co. On 2 Mar 1785 he surveyed 1000 acres on Goose Creek, adjoining land he had marked and improved for his brother JOSEPH in 1776 (Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, p. 129; and Kentucky Ancestors, a series, Vol. 28(1), pp. 7, 9, 11).

In 1786, Lincoln Co., KY, he began selling his land in the Danville area at an average of more than a pound per acre.

On 17 Jan 1789, Fayette (now Trimble) Co., KY, he acquired and surveyed 1600 acres on Mill Creek; he now had 4000 acres in the Jefferson Co. area. On 17 Jun 1990, Nelson (now Greene) Co., KY, he acquired and had surveyed 1500 acres on the middle fork of Pitman Creek adjoining James Dozier and John Boss. He sent his sons Michael, about 20, and George, about 17, with James McCullough and Burrell Jackson to make the survey (Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, p. 130).

Between 1790-1793 JOHN was mentioned in a number of Lincoln Co., KY, depositions, and mentioned as "of Lincoln Co." and "of Jefferson Co." on various deeds.

In 1793 JOHN and ISABELLE and their younger children were living in Jefferson Co., KY, on Goose Creek near Louisville, and Michael moved up from Nelson Co. and acquired land on Dougherty's Creek of the Little Kentucky River in Henry (now Trimble) Co., where he remained until his death in 1830.

By 1800 JOHN resided in Jefferson Co., KY, and most of the family, including his brothers HENRY, JOSEPH, and GEORGE and their families, were concentrated in Jefferson or Henry Cos. In 1802, JOHN appointed his son George as agent to sell his Mill Creek land and possibly made his first trip into Indiana Terr., where settlement had begun the previous year.

On 7 Mar 1811, Harrison Co., Indiana Terr., JOHN was appointed Justice of the Peace. Only Michael of his sons remained in KY.

In 1812, Stampers Creek Twp., Orange Co., IN, the family began entering land and most of his sons came to live there; two taught school in log cabins; some operated grist mills; they served in the militia and some had small civil posts, just as in VA and KY. In 1813, John's son-in-law William Charles, Mary's husband, was killed by Indians in one of their last incursions in the area (Register of the KY Historical Society, p. 131).



Children of John Daugherty Sr. and Isabelle Anna Patton were:

+ 24 i. Michael Daugherty was born ABT 1769 in now Wythe or Tazewell Co., VA, and died 1830 in Henry (now Trimble) Co., KY.
25 ii. George D. Daugherty was born 1773 in now Tazewell Co., VA, and died 14 MAR 1842 in Orange Co., IN. He married Hannah Boyd. She was born ABT 1775? in of Barren Co., KY, and died 11 JUL 1846 in Orange Co., IN.
26 iii. Naomi Daugherty was born 1775 in VA. She married Thomas Motley 12 MAR 1795 in Jefferson Co., KY. He was born ABT 1775?
+ 27 iv. William Daugherty Sr. was born 19 OCT 1775 in VA, and died 22 NOV 1852 in Greene Co., IN.
28 v. Sarah Daugherty was born 1776 in KY, and died 10 AUG 1826 in Orange Co., IN. She married Michael Miller 02 APR 1807 in Jefferson Co., KY. He was born ABT 1795?
29 vi. Ellender Daugherty was born 1777 in KY. She married Charles Beasley 19 JUN 1798 in Jefferson Co., KY. He was born ABT 1775?
+ 30 vii. Samuel Daugherty was born 1781 in Danville, Lincoln Co., KY.
+ 31 viii. Henry Daugherty was born 1784 in KY, and died BEF 14 NOV 1846 in Orange Co., IN.
+ 32 ix. John Daugherty Jr. was born 1788 in Danville, KY, and died 02 JAN 1856 in IL.
33 x. Robert S. Daugherty was born 15 APR 1791 in KY, and died 21 JAN 1865 in Orange Co., IN. He married Sarah "Sally" Tanner ABT 1812?, daughter of John Tanner Jr. and Rachel Caine. She was born 18 OCT 1794 in KY, and died 01 MAY 1854 in Orange Co., IN.
34 xi. Mary Daugherty was born ABT 1793 in KY, and died 1816 in Orange Co., IN. She married William Charles 19 MAR 1811 in Harrison Co., IN. He was born ABT 1785?, and died 1813 in Orange Co., IN.

 

Capt. John's grandson Maj. John Dougherty, Western Explorer:

96. Maj. John Daugherty (Michael Daugherty10, John Daugherty Sr.9, Michael Daugherty II8, Michael Mor Daugherty I7, Liam O'Dougherty6, Liam O'Dougherty5, Sean O'Dochartaigh4, Conn O'Dochartaigh3, Aodh O'Dochartaigh2, Cornelius O'Dochartaigh1) was born 1791 in KY, and died in his home 28 DEC 1860 in Liberty, MO. He married Mary Hertzog 23 NOV 1823 in St. Louis, MO. She was born ABT 1820? in Philadelphia, PA, and died 1873.

He traveled to the Rocky Mountains and spent six years on the Columbia River or Oregon Terr. in service of Manual Lisa, a Spanish fur trader; and Dougherty at 19 was the recognized leader of the group between 1809 and 1815. He was reported by Thomas James, on a trip up the Missouri River with a group of Lisa's trappers, as, "Daugherty, as if inspired by the scene [high, desolate, snow-covered mountains dark with deer and buffalo] with the spirit of poetry and song, broke forth in one of Burns' noblest lyrics" in 1810.

He was a deputy Indian agent selected as guide and interpreter, and his brother Henry was a hunter, on Maj. Stephen H. Long's exploration to the little known Yellowstone country and to establish military posts on the upper Missouri River. Their brother Joseph accompanied them between 1819 and 1820. An Indian agent on the Upper Missouri; his nomination was confirmed by President John Quincy Adams on 19 Jan 1827. John was known as a firm friend of the Indians 1827-1837. He made his headquarters just below Omaha on the Missouri River and was often mentioned in accounts of Prince Maximillian of Wied-Neuwied on his travels in 1830 at Bellevue, NB.

"Multnomah," Liberty, Clay Co., MO 

 Multnomah, a Clay County mansion built in 1856 about seven miles northwest of Liberty, and its builder, Maj. John Dougherty, are pictured on a tinted postcard reproduction of a painting by George Barnett. A stream of carriages with guests are arriving at the front door for an "evening summer party." The major was well known for his hospitality.
Major Dougherty's colorful career as an explorer, fur trapper, first Indian agent in Kansas, government interpreter, major in the U.S. Army, sutler and freighter, Missouri Congressman and plantation owner, began in 1808 when he was 17. He spoke French and seven Indian dialects.
His early explorations led west through Missouri in Clay County along Shoal Creek. The place was alive with wild game, bright with wild flowers and fruit, and with a heavy growth of walnut, oak and sycamore. He vowed he would return eventually to establish his permanent home, and did so 20 years later. He named his Clay County plantation after the beautiful falls in Oregon, which he had visited on his first journey west.
The Indian word Multnomah means "many waters." The home faced the wooded banks of Shoal creek, tumbling along over limestone and flint that the Missouri tribe of Indians had cherished during their occupancy of the same area.
John Dougherty died at Multnomah Dec. 28, 1860, his wife, Mary Hertzog Dougherty, originally from St. Louis, died 13 years later. Sons of the major took over the large farm and occupied the house. Some of their descendents reside in the county today.
The mansion was destroyed by fire in April 1963. It was vacant at the time and had recently been condemned as unsafe.
Kansas City Times, 11 Jan 1985

From Postcard Collection of Kansas City, MO Library


The marriage of John Daugherty and Mary Hertzog produced nine children, four of whom lived to adulthood: Annie Elizabeth, Lewis Bissell, O'Fallon, and John Kerr Dougherty. The descendents possess amazing collections of letters, wills, deeds, bibles, books, artifacts, etc. , according to Mark W. Kelly, attorney and archeologist of Leavenworth, KS.